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Drysuit Choices: WTB


Skoot1123
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Ill second @9400. I spend all winter skiing at TL in a Camero2.0 and never once get off the water with a chill. The biggest benefit, deep water starts are EASIER then without a suit (more buoyancy and no drag from board shorts. Also, there is no additional drag once up skiing, so the transition out of suit is a non issue.
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I use my O'Neil Fluid drysuit in NH. Have used it in 35f water/40f degree air. Very warm and relatively nonrestrictive for preseason skiing. I had another O'Neil drysuit for 20 years prior to this one. No other manufacturer is going to match that durability. Had a zipper issue when my old one was 5 years old. O'Neil fixed it at no cost to me. Great company to deal with.

 

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Are you talking about getting in off the platform saying hit it it and getting back in the boat? Okay I guess you won't have a problem. Not with mine. Depending on where I'm at I'm a 150 -155 lb. Much below 65 degrees water and if I'm in there for any amount of time doing coursework there's no way I'm going to tell you that I'm toasty warm and I'm getting out and it's as good as a drysuit - no way. If other guys are going to tell you they are as great as a drysuit good for them that's my personal experience. It is not as good as a drysuit.. it is what it is - it's a good quality low cost very fragile wetsuit. People are all nice, no problems, but am I going to tell you you're going to stay as warm as a drysuit,? No I am not. Go ahead now start the thumbs down responses.
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My O’Neill Assault Hybrid suit is one of my prized possession. Great for extending the ski season and making dock/lift install and removals more comfortable during the shoulder seasons. Unfortunately, it appears O’Neill discontinued and they have an all neoprene Fluid suit now. Prior to the hybrid suit I had a baggy suit which was tough to ski in.
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I think it depends on what temps you are skiing in. In Alberta I can’t ski early April or into November without a dry suit. Camaro is great. But when the water is below 45° and the air is colder it’s not enough to keep me warm.

I’ve used an Oniell boost bag suit for years already and love it.

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I've been in my Camaro down to 38F water, 50F air. I'm not going to lie and tell you it was toasty, but it was surprisingly doable. All I could think about was how cold my hands and feet were so there's that. If I frequently skied in those temps, I'd put a heater shirt over the top of it as the zipper isn't water tight. The rest more or less is water-tight provided you tuck it into your boots and gloves.

 

After having a baggy dry suit and a Camaro, I'd never go back to a drysuit. And this was in Wisconsin, skiing in March.

 

But... I moved to Arizona now so... I'd recommend that or Florida if it's doable! :)

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I will be doing course work and other odd jobs in the water. Waterskiing will be a part of what I’m doing - but I’m mostly getting this for doing work in and around the lake. Like replacing the tubing from the sub buoy to the buoys after the ice has wreaked havoc on them. Ice is out now so time to put the buoys back.
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I’m a 30 year user of OS Systems drysuits...yeah, the baggy ones. It’d be great for the course work you’re describing, as well as skiing. The ability to layer accordingly- and stay dry! - are the huge pluses.

 

Just picked mine up from the factory (outside Portland, OR); had a minor crotch seam leak retaped and the waist bungee taken out - It had been coming unglued and I guess that can’t be fixed on a 15 year old suit.

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@Skoot1123, I have a Bare Ultra Dry drysuit that I bought about 10 years ago. It's fairly expensive now. I like mine and use it a ton. I wear loose fitting wind pants or sweatpants with a sweatshirt and I'm warm, dry, and can move well. Shuswap still sells them. I think their prices might be in Canadian dollars. I paid about $360 US when I bought the suit originally.

 

O'Neill makes the Boost baggy drysuit and it is less expensive. I don't know how that one would be and I haven't seen anyone with one of those.

 

I also have the old style O'Neill Assault hybrid drysuit and that one has been fairly decent as well. I use the Bare more and actually bought the Assault as a backup for times when I have to replace a seal on the Bare. I've only had the Assault for less than a year and only tried it out a couple times. I got a closeout deal from Amazon for $300 last year. With the type of seals that the Assault has, there is a small amount of water that does seep in, especially around the legs - but I don't use the cinches that are provided. I am more dry in the Bare.

The worst slalom equipment I own is between my ears.

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https://www.perfski.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=drysuit

 

@Skoot1123 Oneill boost is baggy. Of baggies, it's the least draggy baggy I have skied in. I prefer a baggy for "in the water" work jobs with docks etc in the cold cuz I can layer and stay warm. I wear some neoprene booties with it for that kind of thing.

 

For skiing I like the hybrids but never found one that stayed truly dry for long.

 

Wondering how the all neoprene from Oneill works out. Skiwarm made a Sahara long time ago that was all neo and dry...I'd be curious to try an all neo. Can't really layer but not all that air drag when skiing and water drag coming out of the hole.

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Just pulled the trigger on an O’Neill Fluid neoprene drysuit. Looking forward to getting it and seeing how it holds up. I’ll be doing course work and if comfortable enough some skiing. Looking forward to starting this season after some serious offseason training. I’ll report back when I have used it. Thanks for all the recommendations BOS members. You all rock!
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I went back and forth between the neoprene drysuit and the baggy style. Ended up going with the baggy O’Neill Boost. Couldn’t be happier, easy on and off I drop the top of it down between sets. I always stay completely dry where as the neoprene suits seem to leave you a little moist after a while. I find it easier to ski in the drysuit then in my full wetsuit, very good range of motion.
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Similar to @Rednucleus, I wear a long sleeve tee shirt, then an old, thin, pullover O’Neill Gooru vest, then a sweatshirt. Another option I use sometimes is a Camaro heater top and the vest.

The worst slalom equipment I own is between my ears.

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Years ago I struggled with deepwater starts in a bag with a vest over it, too much flotation maybe? I now burp the neck seal until I'm floating about the same as wearing a comp vest, for some reason that works quite well.........But yeah, now you and the crew need to keep in mind you're not wearing a vest.
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O'Neil Fluid user here in Colorado. It's a great suit that allows you to ski/work in 50 degree water temps all day. If working, I wear Aqua socks and booties to make sure the dogs stay toastie. I've got neoprene gloves of various thickness plus a neoprene surf beanie to keep the top half warm. Skied in 52 degree water with 50 degree air temps the other day. Didn't notice anything at all. (other than my one face plant!)

 

IMHO the biggest thing with Oneil is getting to try their various sizes ahead of time. I;m more of a medium person but had to go with a small to get the best seal on my chicken legs/wrists. I also got a killer deal of $250 on a brand new suit which significantly swayed me. With that said, Oneil makes a lot of sizes so it's worth trying on a few different sizes.

Newer super-stretch wetsuits are awesome but I still believe in a good drysuit if you are going to spend signifigant amounts of time in the water. I wear a Billabong super-stretch heater top for surfing and early/late summer skiing and couldn't be happier with it.

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@powbmps thank you for comment. Long John is a good idea for colder days. I currently use lycra first layer - easy in and easy out. Tried w/o first layer but it was very wet inside.

By the way - is there any "Know How" how to zip/unzip it without help?

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