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TXi’s actual weight on trailor?


OscawanaSkier
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Tongue weight will vary by number of axles. For most light SUV you'd want the duals for any real pulling to get less tongue weight and more stability braking.

 

This is one of my contention points against the way ski boats have gone. 5K loaded is beyond most every SUV other than Tahoe/Yukon etc.

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I'm not sure if I'm much help, but I weighed my Sunsetter LXI with dual axle trailer when I got it. Boat is supposed to be 2900 dry.

 

Scale said 4150 with 1/2 tank of gas. 390 on the tongue. I figure 4300 with all my junk in there. You really want a vehicle that can tow 5000 lbs. I do it with a 4500 lb tow vehicle and it's OK but not awesome.

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@ski6jones - I wish I could (don’t want to be surprised heading down the huge hill on my way to the gas station!)

 

Malibu states dry weight as 3100lbs. Single-axle trailor adds 1080lbs so we’re up to roughly 4200lbs.

 

Gas weighs about 6lbs per gallon, so another 240lbs for a full tank brings us up to roughly 4450lbs.

 

So the big question is, how accurate is the “dry weight”? I’ve heard some manufacturers don’t include engine weight??? That could be another 800lbs. Not to mention gear, undrained bilge water, etc, etc.

 

Short answer is - TXi is too heavy for the medium-sized SUV we were considering (Audi Q5) which has a max trailering weight of 4400lbs.

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@OscawanaSkier - can you take your boat/trailer down to a CAT scale - it was like 20 bucks when I did it ? Our 13 Pilot doesn't feel unsafe but it does take a bit to get going. My main concern would be insurance if you got into an accident and you were over capacity. The newer Pilots can tow 5000 if you care for the look of them.
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I just happen to be in the market for a family tow vehicle in the next week or so. Don't have a boat yet but, tow vehicle first boat second. I know the Durango can tow 6,200 with the V6 and that's on my short list. I also like the new Traverse, which is as big as the Durango now but towing is 5,000. My friend has a '97 bubble back SN with the two axle trailer and claims a fully loaded wet weight of just under 4,500. For the Traverse:

 

GCWR = 10,250 lb

Vehicle = 4,640 lb

Trailer = 4,500 lb

People = 520 lb

Margin to limit for gear = 10,250 - 4640 - 4500 - 520 = 590 lb

 

Point is, it works but I really don't like towing at the limit like that in the hilly region of Pittsburgh. My only saving grace here is that I will likely only tow four times a year and not with gear or kids, just storage and marina at the beginning and end of the year. If I can get a single axle then things start looking better.

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@OscawanaSkier ya likely too heavy - I think the UK has the best all around guides to what these cars can actually do (campers pulling caravans pretty common) - and their charts are usually Curb weight x.85 for trailer safety at speed - but with a higher number for tow capacity based on starting the load.

 

Above 85% of the curb weight most SUVs get really sketchy at highway speeds.

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It’s not rocket science. Either by a truck or buy an SUV that has some beef to it and you will be fine. I have a Mega cab Cummins and it pulls the shit like it isn’t even back there. Don’t buy a pu**y tow vehicle period and you have to worry about safety. Forget about how much it weighs. Safety is more important.
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@BraceMaker, using the curb weight x 0.85% the Ford Expedition can only tow 5,124 lb. That's a vehicle that is rated to 9,000 lb using the SAE J2807. I don't advocate towing at vehicle limits though and I think rating a vehicle for towing way more than it really should is straight dishonest by the manufacturers. If it isn't safe to tow the weight on the highway with decent hills, then that shouldn't be the rating. One of the reasons I like the SAE J2807 standard, though some have found ways to pad numbers while claiming they meet the standard.

 

I also don't think a Mega Cab Cummins is required for towing a ski boat. Not saying anything negative about owning one, just that it's overkill for 4,500 lb.

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@vtmecheng - I think this can be an important consideration, On Frame SUV's like Yukons, Expeditions ETC are trucks with a body - Audi Q5 are big unibody SUV's - Anything with a solid rear axle on a frame handles towing better than unibody SUV's - that 85% idea works really well when dealing with your average consumer towing their stuff when they don't necessarily think about tongue weight, loading gear and crew and then go flying down the road. Your usual weekend warrior will be pretty safe in an expedition with a 5k trailer in tow. That same guy in a Q5 with 4500 pounds... Not so pretty.

 

 

You can use the .85 as a litmus test about what would really be appropriate for towing down a highway - in the UK where people tow campers behind VW golfs - they have tons of websites devoted to tongue weight, brakes, brake actuators, brake bias and effective weight towable. Good resources for looking at SUV and ski boat combos.

 

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What does your average tow look like? Any highways where you're likely to do 75 MPH? Any hills?

 

If you're towing at highway speeds or dealing with hills, curvy roads, etc, I'd strongly recommend something based on a half ton truck frame.

 

My Response LX weighs right around 4000 lbs with a full tank of fuel on a tandem trailer. Recently we towed it to the lake, which includes both freeway driving and driving a mountain road, behind a Durango Citadel with the Pentastar. The usual tow vehicle is my half ton Denali 1500. The Durango didn't feel squirrely per se, but it certainly didn't have the planted feel of my body-on-frame half ton truck. If the Durango were my tow vehicle, I'd be looking to upgrade it.

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@UWSkier - “usual” towing will be less than 1mile of driving to gas up and splash in the lake beginning of season. Tried this in another Q5 - no problem!

 

If I need to trailor to my dealer, it’s a 30mile drive on medium hills including 15miles of highway. Maybe ok in good weather and taking it very easy??

 

I would never consider driving the two GIANT hills near us with a Q5. The TXi would push me down the hill!

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@OscawanaSkier if that is all you need to do a Q5 will be fine. I towed my 02 LXI on a vehicle with a 3500 pound tow rating 2 miles to the launch pad to put it in in the spring then pull it in the fall. I have been in my buddy has pulled his 16 Prostar more than 30 Miles with the same vehicle. Just take it easy for the longer drive if you need to go to the dealer.

 

For regular longer towing I agree with more vehicle but for what you need the Q5 will be fine.

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If you go with a vehicle that is close to being max’ed out, that’s ok for your local 1 mile trips, but consider having the dealer come pick it up for service and drop it off, or borrow a friend’s truck for that trek.

 

In terms of specific vehicles, I would avoid the Honda Pilot/ridge line. I towed my SN196 behind my wife’s pilot once - and it was not a pleasant experience. The rear struts we’re toast after that one 180 mile round trip.

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My towing is mostly a 1 mile trip to/from boat ramp Spring and Fall. In 2010 I used my then, Honda Ridgeline (5000 lb rating) to tow my then, LXI, from NC to MA (700 miles). In 2015, I used my Touareg TDI (7700 lb rating) to tow my Prostar 197 from VA to MA (500 miles). Both were more than up to the task.

I have a small camper (4000 ?). The TDI unquestionably more competent for that.

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One thing to remember when you are looking at European tow ratings for undersized tow vehicles is that most of the Australian and European trailers ive seen have electric over hydraulic brakes. Most us trailers are hydraulic surge, which means you are screwed if the trailer wants to pull you into the water or starts lurching side to side on the highway
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@oldjeep they do and with a brake controller make towing way nicer.

 

I've installed some electric drum brakes on a marine trailer with an added blob of silicone on the wires and that's been fine but the next step is definitely an electric brake actuator and hydraulic discs. Big $ uptick to go from mag drums to electric hydraulic - cheaper if you already have surge but still.

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I converted my surge brakes over to electric over hydraulic this last summer. I by no means needed it with my 3/4 ton truck, but damn is it nice a smooth. I really like the control of it and I can stop much better and more predictable with it as well.

Well worth the $800 or so I put into it.

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