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What would happen if someone ran 43off during a tournament?


jgills88
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I know that breaking the record would be a huge jump (although I've heard that Nate's run it in practice before), but what would the next pass be? I dont think that ropes go any shorter right now, would they speed up the boat for the tournament and come up with a shorter line for the next one?
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Would they have to wait in the water for the driver to accurately re loop the rope, or could they wait on the swim step? :/

 

Either I am sure the good vibe would be gone for the first ever 45 off pass attempt.

 

What would the water temp be that day?

What lake would it happen at?

Who would be driving?

What tournament would host it?

 

 

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cdrqh74gm4he.jpeg

this incredible 15-year old kid Nathan from Oregon was an awesome slalom skier, he used to ski tourneys. Currently 6’7” with over 7ft wingspan and growing; someone like him could do it. But he’s going to the NBA, heard there’s more $ ?

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Well, the first thing that would happen is the lucky skier would realize that he just left $80,000 in incentive money on the table with his ski Co. assuming that all the companies pay $10k per record, there are nine income opportunities between the current record and a full pass.

 

 

Lpskier

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Back at the 1977 Nationals, in runoffs that kept repeating, the loops at 10.75, 10.25, and 9.75 were used. With the Technical Controller hustling down to the dock with splicing fid and a segment of line. Final result was that all ties were never resolved and a tie was called.
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I dont think a 43 off run is far fetched at all. May be a little ways off, but if Nate can do 2.5, then the ability, physics and geometry are there to do 3.5 more. What I am wondering about is when physics and geometry no longer allow the next record to be broken (barring the 8 foot tall skier) then what? As suggested before, I guess 38 mph becomes the new normal?
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I don't think a faster speed makes sense, has too many implications with lake geometry, works at one place but if the boats can't get to speed at a certain site then what do you do? New boats bigger engines whole new cat to skin.

 

You go for the shorter length, certain pros would then probably try an intermediary length and away.

 

An algorithm could be derived to handicap skiers in a variety of ways, might even be more fun in that it would bring up some skiers?

 

 

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In terms of what's physically possible, we've got a ways to go. Even 9.5m ("44 off") is "only" two meters short of the buoy, and there are a lot of people in the world with a reach of at least 2m (about 6'7"). My estimation is that a typical person who is at least 155cm tall (or about 5'1") has theoretically sufficient reach.

 

There are massive challenges that go beyond pure reach that will make it take a very long time to advance much further. But, despite my "hilarious" comments, it is not at all impossible.

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I think my mind's definition of "physically possible" may be off? Sure, if a guy lays out perpendicular to the boat, it's physically possible to have his feet on the other side of the ball. This leads me to a question I've always had...how close to perpendicular with the boat are the guys rounding -41, -43? Would like to see drone footage off a near WR pass.
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My numbers may be wrong and someone can correct me if they are but I think it was Andy who said that every 1” lower the buoy is on the water translates to 4-5” of width. Over the years there have been several changes to buoy diameters and buoy heights that most certainly has an effect on what score is possible.

 

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With regard to size of buoys....

6c3rswc061zz.jpg

 

I've also wondered how close to 90* a skier gets to the boat path. Everyone always talks about the rope being shorter than the distance to the buoy, but you have to subtract from that, the angle, which I assumed was a bit shy of 90* Here is another screen shot I picked up for the Nate 2@41 controversy, at ball 1. He's pretty darn close to even with the boat. As suggested above, I'd like to see a drone shot of a skier at the ball, get out my protractor, do a little trig and see the actual distance the handle is from the ball.

 

06ndtecu6y4u.jpg

 

 

 

 

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Perfect. So when people say he is on a 35.5 foot rope, that is 2 feet shorter than the distance to the buoy. But like I referenced above, or somewhere, given geometry and physics (given speed, just how far out can they pull) How far are they really reaching. Looks like about the best they can do (based on this particular run) is a 25* angle. If that is the case, the rope is only 32.17 feet from center. So at 39.5 off, they are really having to reach almost 5.5 feet, not 2 feet. Now do this for 43 off....tho I am wondering if the shorter rope lets them get even greater angle???

 

thvg43jmnhbz.jpg

 

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tape on the hull won't be as accurate as overhead though to much flex in the rope at slack moments for the human eye to gauge accurately.

 

If you want to get down to specific numbers, I think overhead views are the only way to get accurate information

 

at 43 if someone was able to get to:

 

10 degrees from perpendicular the effective rope length would be 32 feet, they would only lose about six inches of rope length. 5.5' reach

 

At 15 degrees perpendicular to the boat pylon the effective rope length would be 31.4 feet for a 6.1' reach

 

At 20 degrees perpendicular to the boat pylon the effective rope length would be 30.5 feet for a 7' reach.

 

So how far up the pylon do people get at 43 off?

 

 

 

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The physical difference between the rope and the distance to the balls isn't the cause of the limitation anyhow. If it was, the height of the skier would determine success and Stephen Neveu would be the world champion.

The current limit is a function of how perfect the skier's path and timing must be given the short line and the skier's ability to fight off the ever increasing forces that try to pull the skier down course.

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