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Level shoulders. Level head ...wow


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@Lobonator One thing that helps me keep my head and shoulders level is to think about reaching really high with the handle. I try to reach higher than my head, but of course even when I do it well it doesn't go that high, but just about right.
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Mike Kjellander story. I was at a Pro tournament in the 80's in Dallas/Fort Worth. Weird site. Essentially a concrete drainage ditch that was wide enough and deep enough to ski - but very wind protected. My buddy and I were walking up the canal and in the distance we noticed a large blonde guy splayed out across a Pontiac Grand Am. Pretty obvious that he either didn't feel good or was still hung over. We were joking that the guy looked exactly like Mike Kjellander. We got closer and sure enough - it was Kjellander.

 

In the end I guess it really didn't matter how he felt since I'm pretty sure he won the tournament.

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Just why did skiers of yesteryear allow their heads & shoulders to drop (especially the ladies of the 70/80’s), but nowadays everyone is able to keep level? I’m guessing it’s because today’s skis turn much easier and you don’t have to force it round with your body. Or is it just better coaching?
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Its all how you approach the turn. In the course what we do in our preturn depicts what our outcome will be. If you're on your back foot in the preturn you'll finish the turn on the tail of the ski. The same goes for keeping our shoulders level. Off the second wake focus on taking the handle with you more and keeping that line tight all the way out to apex while trying to actively hide that outside shoulder from the pylon. By doing that we stay more balanced and we give ourselves a tight line at the finish of the turn. Not only do we get that tight line, but by taking as much width as possible out to apex we're creating a more rounder turn.

 

 

on the other hand If we approach the turn and let our inside shoulder come to the inside either by an abrupt edge change since we loaded the boat to soon from the previous turn or throwing the handle out fast, we just gave all the width we built behind the boat back to the boat, which puts us on a straight line to the buoy. Since our shoulders are already moving to the inside at the approach of our turn, when our ski casts out our shoulders and feet are farther apart when you come back to the handle. So it makes it much more difficult to stay over our ski, which in turn leads us with shoulders unlevel at the finish and taking to much load from the boat to soon. Then the whole process starts over again since we loaded the boat to soon and it will eventually pull you out of position at the second wake.

 

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