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Thought I would show off my classic I had. Anyone else?


bigskieridaho
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  • Baller

1963 Glastron purchased new at the 1963 MN boat show by my father. We all learned to ski behind it. He sold it in FL 12ish yrs ago to a guy that ended up passing away. It spent 7 yrs in outside storage getting ravaged by FL sun and rain. Guy never registered the boat. Storage facility wanted it gone. Guys family didn't want it so my dad took it back and spent 2 years restoring it. Lots of looks and comments at the boat ramps and on the water. Still take a ski cruise behind it every now and then. He even entered it in one of FL largest antique boat shows. It was placed next to the food tent. We renamed it "Second Chance"

 

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This is a repost from another thread, Your-top-5-best-looking-ski-boat-models-of-all-time

 

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This will always be my choice for very sentimental reasons. This is a 16 foot 1975 Starcraft American with a 1974 Johnson 115. Her name was "Costa Lotta". My parents bought it new after our first summer at the lake in the fall of 1974. I had just turned 13. It was behind that boat that I really learned how to waterski and got good at it and learned to do many other things as well. I took loving care of that boat. I cleaned and waxed the hull every year, did all of the mechanical work and maintenance on it and kept it running beautifully until I finally sold it in 2015, its 40th year on the lake. I had that thing running the best it ever had when I sold it. I loved that boat so much I actually started shedding tears coming in at the end of the last run I ever waterskied behind her.

 

To sell it, I listed it on a popular Canadian classified ad site, Kijiji.ca. Here's how the beginning of my for sale ad went:

 

I can't believe I'm actually doing this. I feel like I'm putting a beloved child up for sale. This boat has been in my family since it was bought in 1974 when I was just 13. I have lovingly taken care of it ever since. So many great memories tied to this boat...

 

The ad went on for 13 more paragraphs where I discussed everything about the boat's repair and maintencance history, condition and an inventory of the large stock of spare parts I had accumulated for it and would let go of with the boat.

 

I then finished up with this:

 

Why am I selling this boat that I'm so attached to and have so much reverence for? It's because in this, its 40th year on the Shuswap, I've replaced it with a similar but much newer boat. I don't have room or need for two ski boats in the boathouse and I fear its condition will detiorate quickly if it gets stored outside the boathouse over the long winters. So, to be kind to it, I need to let it go even though doing so will tear a little piece of my heart out.

 

I'm hoping this boat will go to a young family with kids and parents who want to give their kids the opportunity to learn how to ski, kneeboard and tube and do all the fun stuff I got to do behind this boat as a kid...

 

The response I had from the ad was amazing. I had people from all over the province - some from more than four or five hundred miles away - wanting to come and see the boat. In the end, I sold it to a perfect young family who live down at the other end of my part of the lake. They told me they would buy it before they even saw it. The day they came to pick it up we launched it down at the nearest boat launch and I took the father and 10 year old son for their first ride in it. It started right up after just a couple seconds of cranking dead cold. I idled it out past the buoys and then with a serious look I asked the boy who was sitting up in the bow section if he was holding on tight. He grabbed the rails with both hands and said he was. I looked over at the father who was sitting in the passenger seat and winked. Then I hammered it. The Costa Lotta came flying out of the hole like a scalded dog. Two stroke engines are great for that. Almost instantly we were at top speed and I was cranking sharp turns right and left to show off its great handling. Father and son were shouting woo-hoo! and fist pumping. Big smiles on those two.

 

When we got back to the dock where the mother was waiting, there were high fives all around. Then, the father turned to me and just handed me a big wad of cash without saying a word. He never haggled even a dollar on the asking price.

 

I was very happy to know the boat was going to the right people but watching her head down the lake with new owners in it was one of the most bittersweet experiences of my life. I love my new boat (Costa Lotta II) and have never regretted buying it but I do miss my beloved Costa Lotta and always will. It's funny how we can sometimes be so sentimental about inanimate material objects. :'(

 

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Even though she's an old boat, I think she has beautiful lines. For me, she'll always be the most beautiful ski boat ever. :'(

 

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I’m definitely a classic Correct Craft nut. It was hard for me to find pictures of outside the boat, every picture was basically inside of my son or inside looking out. 1976 Ski Nautique, hot 351W Escort which is probably one of the more rare engines in CC’s. Sadly it’s spent the past year in my garage with no floor because I’ve been doing the slowest exhaust hose replacement in history. My dad bought an identical 1975 Ski Nautique, but with the small letters and a Waukesha engine brand new in 1974 and he still has it in fair condition. These classic CC’s is what got me passionate about skiing. I guess my modern tug, a 1993 Ski Nautique could be considered a classic by now.

 

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  • Baller

A few of us on BOS have had small Whalers in our skiing journey. Age 12 to 17 this was our family ski boat. For younger skiers this had and still has ANY inboard beat for small wakes - so there was no intimidation factor ripping back and forth behind it. We taught dozens and dozens of people to ski behind it. I learned to step off barefoot behind it when I was 14. By end of high school i was big enough that it lacked mass and hp, but wish we still had it in the family now that there are grandkids coming along!

 

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25 yrs later I owned a couple of Glastrons. This CVX-16 with 2.0L 120 hp was a lot of fun and helped me start recruiting friends to wake up early and go skiing.

 

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  • Baller

Nostalgia...love the old Nautiques. We grew up skiing on a narrow reservoir in Iowa (like skiing a river) and the marina was a Nautique dealer. So many Nautiques and no one that could ski worth a dink behind 'em.

 

We ran fast, metal-flake outboards with tiny wakes and threw up huge "Balls of Spray", barefooted, and got our kicks showing jet boats that we were indeed faster. We were wally's, man! I can still see all 6 ft 7 of my bro Joe swinging the handle around in circles to chuck it out to full length (75 feet!!) and hear the slap of a ski being tossed to the awaiting skier bobbing in the water.

 

Fueling up at the pier, tho, while mixing our gas/oil, we had envy of those boss Nautiques with air intakes up front, swim platforms, 2 speedometers and that carbed V8 growl. We thought we were pretty cool...but we had some envy, too.

 

Simpler times, incredible times. "Lake Delhi" was our Chattahoochie with Nautique 2001's everywhere.

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