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binding spread


ForrestGump
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Just like the angle of the dangle is important, spread between bindings is also. This came up because of a conversation between Horton and I about an unnamed ski. The conversation was "XXX told me that toe plate skiers really do well on ski YYY." So I got out the trusty ol tape measure and started playing with bindings. I remember from my toe plate days prior to breaking all my body parts that my big toe was touching the rear of my Reflex shell. Measuring that way put me at 12 1/4" ankle bone to ankle bone spread. That was the best I ever skied, getting into 38 regularly. Putting my current reflex and HO binding on the ski put me at over 13". I radiused the back of the reflex plate and could get to 12 5/8. I then moved the horseshoe and release back on my Reflex plate and switched to a Wiley rear plate and that got me all the way back to that 12 1/4" spread. I then put that setup on that YYY ski Horton and I were originally discussing and found that I liked it. BTW...... don't ask what ski that was. That is not relevant to the conversation here.

 

Now this is not to say that everyone will like a 12 1/4" spread. But to say that a lot of times we will go with something, in this case binding spread, because the combo we've chosen only allows us to go so far. I had the HO plate butted up against the reflex plate and called that good. But 15 minutes of playing with the setup got me way better.

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I have played with foot spread at times. When I was getting coaching at one point the coach suggested I move my rear binding back. When I skied on one ski I tried (which I never really liked) it skied much better with my feet as close together as possible.

 

I generally like a little gap between my feet but I am willing to try different things. Part of my issue with tweaking things is I get limited sets and time so burning sets trying things that don't work is annoying however not doing runs the risk of not picking up relatively easy gains.

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  • Baller

I've wondered what is the impact of ankle spacing when two skiers on same length ski have way different foot size, say one with size 9 boots, the other with size 12.

Obviously, ankle spacing will be more with larger feet and boots touching.

Wouldn't that tend to put more weight towards the back of the ski?

Also, the bf 'spec' is the same for either boot size. So, size 12 front toes (and ball of foot) is further forward. Does that offset back foot being further back?

Note: this does not keep me up at night.

 

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It is painful how much I've learned from long conversations with @AdamCord. One of things I've learned from that knucklehead is that increasing spread will increase smear through on side. The downside is of course by moving your feet further apart you are more susceptible to losing your hips and moving your weight over your back foot. Generally speaking I try to keep my spread to a minimum and my feet as close as possible. If absolutely everything else is working perfect and I need a little more slide at on side I will leave my front finding where it's at and with my back binding back a tick.

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About Horton

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Toes touching the front boot used to be the accepted norm, but not so much any more. You have to measure ankle to ankle and may have to adjust the plate or cut the toe of hardshell boots to achieve your best position. Set your front boot position first, keeping the spacing constant while testing, then adjust the rear position. Once you know your best spacing, use that first when testing a new ski.
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