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Draining a 200 6.0L


jercrane
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Getting pretty cold this week in the northeast. I went to drain my 2018 SN 200 6.0L for the first time last night and got stumped by one item in the list of steps in my manual.

 

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I am good on 2 through 6 but can't for the life of me figure out where #1 is. Engine oil cooler inlet hose? Per the note in the diagram I think the routing is different than illustrated so I'm a little stuck. Any chance someone has a picture they could post of this hose connection on a 200.

 

I really need to study this engine better. Probably didn't help that I was doing the whole thing in the dark with a head lamp.

 

Poked around in some old threads but didn't have any luck. Hopefully someone can give me some guidance here.

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@oldjeep good tip on the plunging thanks

 

Should I be dumping the strainer as well, in your opinion? I'm a "rather be safe than sorry" guy so I'm open to any suggestions.

 

Mind you I'm not fully winterizing here. I'm just doing this overnight for the next couple of weeks when the temps are going to drop into 20's. So it needs to be reasonable enough I can put it all back together in 15 to 20 or so.

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Yes, dump the water out of the strainer. Hoses #6 the ones that they attach to the block drains should be plunged. I can't count the number of times I've had the block drains (without hoses) be plugged up or partially plugged up with rust scale, casting sand or lake debris.
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@jercrane - On my 6.0 it is located exatelly as the drawing, the hose is attached to a black metal tube, this metal tube has 2 smal oil hoses on its side. In fact it is not "engine oil cooler" it should say "transmition oil cooler". You can also follow the oil hose that leaves the transmition, it will enter the transmition cooler you are looking for.
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@Alberto Soares some of these boats have both an engine cooler and a transmission oil cooler. When they have both one is upstream and one downstream from the raw water pump.

 

Since you're just doing a quickie, I'd dump the strainer, pull the hose off the intake pump and blow through it like a tuba, replace the hose and the strainer and you'll be good to go for next time.

 

If you want to be extra safe/avoid a dry impeller start up you can blow, replace strainer and beer bong some pink antifreeze back into the strainer.

 

That plus make up a 5 gallon bucket with a bulkhead fitting and its own hose so you can hook it to the pump when you blow out the intake line and you can mostly winterize the engine in a way that will be good for a decent freeze in about 3 minutes.

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@jercrane what I have done is taken a 5 gallon bucket, drilled a hole in the bottom, attached a valve and 1.25" heater hose to it, attached the other end of the hose to the intake side of the strainer basket (after the engine has been warmed up). Put a couple gallons of rv antifreeze in the bucket, draw the coolant through the system, emptying the bucket. When the coolant comes out the exhaust, I'm done. No draining the engine required.
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Just did that exact motor on my 18 200. Alberto is correct it is located in same place as pictured. The only difference is it is coming from the water strainer from the other side(loops under motor from strainer to #1 in picture). Note the note on top of the page that the route may vary.
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@JohnBrooks That technique is going to catch up to you one of these winters. For starters, the exhaust is not always the "end of the line". That's a common misconception. If the T-stat is closed to any degree and the block is full of water, that antifreeze is bypassing the whole block and going right out the exhaust. Secondly, RV antifreeze is not meant to be diluted. Not draining the block before any AF fill of any sort is just asking for trouble. Drain and leave it dry or drain and backfill after draining.
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You could also consider adding a magnetic block heater to your system for swing season cold preparations. I had a 200-watt KAT heater on my drained 5.7L last night. Not a long-term solution and dependent on reliable power, but provides a little extra protection between uses of the boat. The KAT heater 'CSA Rated for Canada', are better for use in an enclosed space.

Unfortunately, I am doing the full winterization and storing the boat this weekend.

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@vtjc I do have power and wifi that reaches the dock.

I actually have one of these in the boat next to the engine box with the box propped open. https://www.amazon.com/Caframo-Engine-Compartment-Heater-Silver/dp/B00MEMRGZE/ref=sr_1_1

 

I'm hoping draining plus this gets me to the end of the month.

 

Also since I'm a pretty neurotic I got one of these and put it in the engine box.

https://www.amazon.com/SensorPush-Wireless-Thermometer-Hygrometer-Android/dp/B01AEQ9X9I/ref=sr_1_3

plus

https://www.amazon.com/SensorPush-G1-WiFi-Gateway-Anywhere/dp/B01N17RWWV/ref=sr_1_1

 

That allows me in those moments of panic to just check on the current temp in the boat from my phone. I use that to monitor our lake house temps through the winter in general since we don't winterize the house.

 

Yes I know ... I have issues. Just be glad you aren't married to me. For so many reasons.

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So to be clear - the bucket method is a way to very quickly get antifreeze into a known hot engine. And you should start with something like -50 or -100 not the -30.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Camco-30054-Antifreeze-Concentrate-1-Quart/dp/B004VU8ZD4/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1539879724&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=rv+antifreeze+concentrate&psc=1

 

You have a heater + are draining the water in the surrounding... you should be OK - keep it tarped to cut the wind losses and even better toss a thermal blanket over the engine hatch to keep the heat in and you should be set.

 

Wind chill FYI doesn't cool the engine down past the ambient it just gets it there faster, so if you have a 20 degree day with 0 degree windchill you only need to be protected to 20 degrees. Blocking the wind however, having it well tarped, and having a way to keep the heat from the engine heater from rising up through the engine hatch and blowing away are all helpful for prolonging your season with out fear.

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For posterity in the future if anyone else comes across this post.

 

I found it ... very easy in the daylight. ;)

 

Just following the lines from the through hull all the way through the system is the key. Again ... very easy with daylight. Little more challenging at 10PM with a headlamp and 40 degrees.

 

The other thing I did which helps with access and view a lot is I removed the lower section of the engine cover as well. That bottom 10-12 inch, carpeted section that the box cover pivots on. Kind of a pain to get it up off the bolts solo but its doable. Once that is out of the way the whole process takes me about 10 minutes to drain and 10 minutes to reassemble. I also discovered this makes removing the belt shroud MUCH easier. I know this seems probably kind of duh to most of you but ...

 

Never said I was smart. :) I do listen well though!

 

thanks all

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@jercrane I've used this approach for years without issue. I don't live in the cold dark north (live in NC), although my ski partner used it in Maine without issue, so we don't get those long stretches of super cold weather and our summer is longer than 2 or 3 months :-). We typically experience 2 snows per year and normally each is melted and gone within 24 to 48 hours.
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For H5/H6 owners– I'm really surprised that on the H5/H6 manual they don't mention disconnecting and draining the trans and engine coolers (but they do on the 6.0L diagram above) since these parts lie horizontally, are a low point, and are plumbed in series. I blow that whole chain of coolers out with compressed air and backfill with AF FWIW.
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