Jump to content

What's First, Faster or Shorter?


jskier
 Share

Recommended Posts

I found this article (pasted below) by Arturo Nelson, What's First, Faster or Shorter? Curious what people think for people who are relatively new to course skiing:

 

Many slalom skiers want to reach their top speed as soon as possible.

 

Unfortunately learning to run 18mts / 15 off won’t help you much for short line slalom skiing.

 

Also, when speed gets faster the wake gets smaller and skiers do not learn how to use their legs and in most of the cases the skiers absorb the wakes. This will make you loose speed, direction and balance.

 

The difference in the slalom course between 52 km / 32mph and 58 km / 36 mph is 2 seconds approximately.

 

The difference between 18 mts / 15 off and 14 mts / 28 off is 4 meters (13 feet). That is a very big difference. You cannot be struggling with this big difference in rope length coupled with no control at high speeds. So my advice is to take it one at a time: Work first on rope length at lower speeds and when you can control skiing at a certain rope length, start increasing the speed.

 

Here are the steps that I show my students which have been proven to work and that will let you progress faster and better:

 

STEP 1. Run 49 km / 30mph two times in a row, getting earlier to buoy # six than you did to # one.

 

STEP 2. Run 52 km/ 32mph two times in a row, getting earlier to # six than you did to # one.

 

STEP 3. Run 49 km / 30 mph at 16mts / 22 off two times in a row, getting earlier to # six than you did to # one.

 

STEP 4. Run 52 km/ 32mph @ 16mts / 22 off two times in a row, getting earlier to # six than you did to # one.

 

STEP 5. Run 52 km / 32mph @ 14mts / 28 off two times in a row, getting earlier to # six than you did to # one.

 

STEP 6. Run55 km / 34 mph @ 14 mts / 28 off two times in a row, getting earlier to # six than you did to # one.

 

STEP 7. Run 58km / 36 mph @ 14 mts / 28 off two times in a row, getting earlier to # six than you did to # one.

 

STEP 8. Then learn to run 55 km / 34 mph and 58 km / 36 mph @ 18 mts / 15 off

 

You are not supposed to shorten the rope or go faster unless you can run a pass two CONSECUTIVE times with gates, getting EARLY and in control to #6.

 

The reason for doing it this way, is that it’s more important to learn how to run short rope lengths than learning to run faster speeds. And learning to run 18 mts / 15 off doesn’t teach you how to run shorter line lengths. Shortening the rope at lower speeds is the only thing that can teach you how to run shorter line lengths when you get to your maximum speed.

 

Follow my advice and you will notice the progress!

 

http://aqasports.squarespace.com/new-blog-1/2016/3/21/rax60e347tpeg2wyvbei4lixaxhptf

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Baller

Thanks for the post. I'm old enough now to max at 34 mph, but until a short time ago always just left the rope alone and raised the speed, trying to work my way to 34. Recently I have started experimenting with shorter ropes at slower speeds, mostly just out of curiosity. I found it fun and I am wanting to do more of it. I like what you're saying here - I'll go give it a try.

 

thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Baller
When I was playing the faster or shorter game I never ran 15 off at 36. I was running 22 off at 34 as my opener and then going to 36 MPH. 15 off at 36 was just too much rope. Dropping 15 after I was running 22's and 28's at 34 was the best thing I did for 36 MPH.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...