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Reflex Boot ?


Stevie Boy
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I was Looking at the Evolution, but trying to sort out the correct sizing, from across the pond could be awkward, so I have decided to go with the Reflex, there is a dealer nearby so I can try the different sizes, or tho shoe size says 8 shell, going by the length of my foot it comes down to a 6 shell.

I was quite happy with my D3 bindings, but because of knee surgery kicking the ski off was uncomfortable, tried the pulling the top of the ski method and pulled a calf muscle, recently I tweaked my ankle quite bad, not broken but has given me considerable discomfort over the last three weeks.

Getting Old Sucks ! But I,m not giving in.

My question is, how do you Guy,s & Gals who use Reflex measure your boot placement ie: DFT

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Directly under the block. Coming from D3's, the Reflex will be way different. You likely won't be able to turn the ski the first set. You have to commit to the turn, otherwise it'll push back on you and stand you up. I converted to a Reflex front/rtp about 6 weeks ago and I won't be going back.
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@DW Anybody that goes from a soft binding to a hard shell will say the same thing the first time they ride the ski with the hard shell. You figure it out after some sets and all is well. Not something you can try for 1 or 2 sets and have an idea of whether you like it though.

 

In my case, the reflex and rtp move out off the 2nd wake much better than any of my previous hard shell bindings. With the heel free to move, the entire setup became more aggressive and turned harder, which in the end caused me to go longer, deeper, and farther back with the fin.

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I'm hoping to get some Reflex bindings for next year myself so very curious to hear what other people think. When I switched to the EXO hard shell bindings, I felt like I couldn't turn at first either and when I was telling my friend that, someone jumped in the conversation and told me that if I ever go to a Reflex, I'll have the same feeling all over again.
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@jfw432 - Its been awhile (5 years) since I switched from rubber to a front Reflex, but I do remember the first few sets were a bit awkward, but after 3 or 4 days I had it completely figured out. Like @ShaneH said, the cast out at the edge change is almost effortless and automatic. Once you get used to the Reflex you won't regret the change. FWIW I have a front Reflex and rear D3 leverage.
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I swithed from a Connelly Enzo front boot to a Reflex boot this summer and to be honest, didn't notice a vast learning curve. I ran my PB in my third set after the transition to Reflex. I admit, there is a difference, but I don't see any reason why a course skiier shouldn't adapt very quickly.

 

I bought the boot primarily as a safety measure, as I was getting a few ankle tweaks from the Enzo boot, but now I'm just glad a bought it from a skiing perspective and the fact that it's really comfortable. I would never now want to go back to a standard fixed high wrap.

 

 

 

 

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Do you mark your buckles? That was the first thing I needed to do in order to transition to the hardshells, some sets I'd have the boot cranked down and others more loose, I've discovered that I like to have my very upper buckles tight, my toes looser, and my ankle strap tight. So I did some nail polish and am debating filing off the next tooth so I don't have the option.
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I have made little notches in the buckles of my last hard shell boots. I made a notch every 5 clicks so I can easily count 3 clicks shy of the 3rd notch on the front boot and 1 click past the 2nd notch on the rear. Repeatability is key IMO.

 

I didn't realize the Reflex replacement buckles were a screw style. I thought it was 5 options with large gaps between them.

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Ya, the screw style is the snow boot style type, personally, I have found that it is almost too many options for adjusting, and you will screw around with it.

 

I think it is more important if you do not have heat formed liners in your boots, as with the thin liners the notches are loose, medium, oh my god that hurts. Where as in the formed liners, it usually feels good in the third click.

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Thanks MS I will throw them an email.

Spesh £300 on a binding arrangement and another £100 - £150 on a plate, I make that £400 - £450, on a binding, I do not know whether I am going to get on with, I have spent years on rubber, you have the luxury of not spending that time on rubber so you adapted to the Hardshell with ease, I was surprised, but you seem to adapt to anything.

Age is not on my side. I was looking at adapting the D3 Leverage plate, not only does it already have the ability to go half a hole, I could make it, where you move the hardware and you could get adjustment in between the half holes, allowing you a greater selection of positions, without interloc

The other Great ! idea I,m thinking about, (Any Ski Manufacturers Out There) is D3 Plate with elongated holes, alminuim or plastic injected elongated washers with a shoulder that goes into the slot, place binding in position get a hole finder and drill hole for attaching screw, Resulting in being able to position binding anywhere and locking it into position, carry spare elongated washers for drilling if you decide to move binding.

 

Anybody like that Idea, or is it a bit off the wall ?

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i skiid double boots for about ten years, from both rubber to both hardshell and eventually on to the "hybrid" RS1. while in Mexico last winter i made the decision to go back to a RTP and within 3 sets i was back in the course feeling parts of the ski i hadn't felt in years. it was THE best thing i have done for my skiing in a number of years. Not only did it increase the tip pressure, but the knee pain from the rear boot holding the back heel down to the ski was gone. so i was having MORE fun skiing, and feeling better and healthier after and during it. However i did not trust the RS1 to release as i had not come out of them in a little over 4 years, so i got a reflex setup and have been VERY happy about the current setup. still haven't knocked my shins in an OTF and looking at that picture above i am hoping i never do anything like that!
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The wounds on shinbones do not com from the release - they result from hitting the shinbone with the block on the rear end of the boot.

If you stuff the ski-tip in an off-side turn you will bleed! (with proper ski-setup these occasions are rare...)

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The caps don`t make any sense. And a regular spray leg sleeve doesn't help much either (too soft and to thin for the impact). To be safe get a shinbone protector from soccer (might need to fix it with some duck tape; maybe footballers use the same - since I'm from Europe I have no clue about football...) and if you realize that you seldomly (never) fall on your offside-turns with a release of the boot you can get rid of it...
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I've been using the system for 6 years. My daughter has used it on trick/slalom for the past 13 years. Several of my club members and countless other skiers I know have used this design and I can honestly say I have never seen anyone injured due to stricking the release. I know it happens but the occurences are so infrequent that it doesn't merit consideration.
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New plates aren't expensive. Believe me, I do tons of work to save money and considered making a carbon fiber plate or buying sheet metal to save the money. After some thought, I realized that I would use $30 in materials to make a good vacuum bagged plate (not a half arsed one) from carbon fiber and maybe $15 for an aluminum plate. So that part sounds cheap but then you have to drill it, countersink it, trim it, seal it, etc. After dulled drill bits from drilling 30+ holes, cut off wheels, primer/paint, and the 2-3 hours to do the work, you'll spend at least 50% of the price of a new one, you'll have wasted hours, and it probably won't look or work as well.
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