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Video: Than running -38 on Nano One


Than_Bogan
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So a Goode rep stopped by last night and recorded most of my set, during which I ran the 7th -38 of my life. Since I've been talking about what this ski can do, I was pretty darn psyched to be able to demonstrate it.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smbQvrDUk8g&feature=youtu.be

 

This is the first time I've been recorded running a -38.

 

I think what you may notice more than anything here is: This doesn't look that good! In the past, I would basically have to do everything as perfectly I ever have in order to complete a -38. With this ski, I can run one with my usual awful style and moving around all over the ski!

 

In addition, this was my 2nd try at -38 after almost a 3 week gap (due to breaking ski and ankle injury), and I was still very much in a mode of "if there is any possible risk to my ankle, STOP." (This might explain a couple of hitches in the run, but then again I just ski like that!)

 

Finally, the astute listener may notice the engine RPM drop as I'm heading out the gate. This is a standard practice technique that we use any time there is a possible slack hit. This helps save the back for when it counts, and I highly recommend it. We err on the side of caution (I'm the youngster at 41 y.o.!), but I think it's pretty obvious that that played no role in allowing me to complete the pass.

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@MS I guess it must be legal in some scenarios, because certain lakes are so short that the boat often must begin to power down before the skier is actually out.

 

But we'll keep doing it in practice even if it's not legal in a tournament. Almost never changes the outcome, but is easier on the skier.

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I asked about this at a drivers clininc once and was told "there's no rule against it, but it is discouraged". I've also used it on occasion driving tournaments and have been scolded about it. I will certainly use it in extreme situations until there is a rule against it. No need for someone to get

injured at the exit gates.

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@Razorskier1 All passes that I complete look easy. I'm not strong enough to make it look hard.

But the crazy thing on this ski is that it actually kinda feels easy, whereas usually I feel like I'm pulling my ass off even though I don't look like I'm doing anything.

 

@Dirt et al. Thanks and yeah, no worries. I had no question of the legitimacy, and I had (driver) @MikeT on High Alert to make sure I didn't reinjure the ankle. So he was even more on the side of caution than usual.

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@MS On this second ski, I never even touched it. Fin and wing are as-out-of-the-box. I did measure, of course, and I could post them if you want, but it's close to the official factory settings and it seems every caliper is a little different so I'm not sure it would mean much beyond just saying "Factory."

 

I do have my boots at 28 11/16, which technically is slightly back. And I'm running my rear boot very close to my front boot, which is different from what I did on my 9900. Boot placement has been the main tuning factor for me. With a little experimentation, that allowed me to cut down the radicalness on my onside while still getting the sweeet offside that this ski had on the first set.

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Tremendous skiing Than.

 

I must say it looked easy. Other than a shoulder drop, your position was great and it looked effortless. Just like all the great skiing videos I've played over and over, it looks like you were very light on the line and had just the right amount of angle, resistance and speed.

 

Great job bud, on to 39.5!

 

Gary

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Thanks @Rich. I always appreciate any advice, because slalom is never done. (Thankfully, in a way.)

 

And that brings me to -39. I did, in fact, try it 3 times. But I'm not close to that one. I've been working hard on my gate to get enough speed and angle before reaching the gate, and I've finally reached "barely adequate" for -38. Naturally, this is totally inadequate for -39. So more to do there.

 

But I think first I need to take a step back and work on my head position. ShaneH pointed out in an earlier thread that my head is not up in the turns, and I've also noticed that I sometimes *really* drop my head over in my on-side turn, which almost always results in a fall.

 

@bananaron Thanks, but it's a bit comical to accuse me of being a pro. Jamie is a mere 3 full passes ahead of where I am, giving him the same relative advantage over me that I have over someone who can only occasionally run -28. Still, I do truly appreciate where I've been able to get in this sport, and I enjoy sharing my knowledge.

 

My bindings are D3 T-Factors. Truly love how they ski; wish they were a hair more durable.

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I do believe I could run -39, but in all honesty I'm not sure I'm willing to do what it would probably take. I'd need to commit to hardcore training every off-season and I'd need to spend a lot more time with pros or other very-high-level coaches. At least right now, I have too many competing goals in my life to justify either of those.

 

But who knows -- maybe I can get one someday anyhow!! I've learned a TON recently and am only just beginning to incorporate into my skiing as instinct.

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You may indeed need to spend more time (than you currently do?) with high-level coaches, BUT I'm sure most of us on BoS would agree you'd need less time than anyone else in the same spot: the way you digest and analyze all the subtleties of slalom technique, I believe you take more away from 5m listening to a coach than most students take from a week. We're all grateful here for thought you put into skiing and the posts you put out.
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@Than - great skiing. Wish I could make it as smooth as you look! That ski looks like it turns on a rail!! The only thing I notice, and it could just be the video, is that it looked like you were on the tail a bit? Correct me if that is WAY OFF. Perhaps that's a result of being careful of your ankle?
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@Skoot1123 The N1 absolutely does turn on rails. That's it's most remarkable feature: No matter what is happening, it just carves the right turn. (It's also its most dangerous feature: You have to decide for yourself when to stop, because the N1 always keeps going.)

There are a few spots that I'm way on the tail, although in most cases I was able to correct reasonably quickly. This could be VERY indirectly related to my ankle, but the main issue is my hip position, which is slightly back from ideal almost the entire run. Lots of mass in hips, so having that a little back equals too much weight toward the tail.

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@Than_Bogan what strikes me most about this pass, as others have said, is how effortless it looks as far as line tension. It doesn't seem like your body is having to deal with huge pressures as the bridge between the boat and ski at all. You don't appear as stacked as you probably do on your easier passes, but yet the boat is not crushing you too badly, either. Are you feeling big hits out of those turns or does it feel as effortless as it looks?
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@jhughes It's easy to tell if I take a big hit out of a turn because I crush into a fetal position and I'm usually done right there. :)

 

That said, it doesn't feel "effortless" at all. Feels like I'm giving it everything I have. But, at least in part because it carves a sweeping-yet-tight-radius turn, the total effort is a little lower on this ski. It's as if the pull phase is shorter yet more effective.

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Than - the more I look at your video, the more I like it and see why you are running your 38s. Even though you are a head and shoulders leaner-inner, you manage it very well and the way you finish your turns and move into your acceleration is one of the main contributing factors to your success. I'm very pro-head up/shoulders level/counterrotation/face down course, but the thing that is so good about your technique is how well you stay with your ski - you ride your ski through the finish of the turn with no change in stance. You don't move back, you don't make a mis-guided effort to get into some overly shoulders-back, chest out position for the pull. You finish your turn well back into the course and over your feet and you are poised to accelerate in a nice leveraged position and get across quickly to the other side. It's actually very Nate Smithian even though it doesn't have the same face value. So, good job, man. I can and will take a clue from you and emulate that part of your skiing.

Jim

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Heh! :) Can't believe it took over 24 hours for someone to call me on the shorts! It's a short entry on that end and with my two-handed gate I don't really have time for any fashion-related shenanigans.

 

The irony is I purposely wore my shorts that usually stay down on their own, since I knew I was being filmed. Naturally, they chose to ride up on the -38...

 

@jimbrake I appreciate the compliments, but ultimately I'm quite confident I can do better with more head up and shoulders level. It's just going to take some unlearning to get there.

 

As to "finish the turn well back into the course," a LOT of that is on the Nano One. I don't necessarily do that well on my 9900. That's one of the biggest things I can feel with this ski and why -38 suddenly doesn't seem THAT hard. The ski sweeps all the way around with the right radius and without losing speed. By the time you have the sensation that the turn is "done," it feels like you're at the first wake!

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@Than - in reverse order: Yeah, but you definitely help the ski do what it does. Believe me, if you were to stop or slow the travel of your head and shoulders before the finish of the turn, the ski would shoot in front of you/wheelie, and unless you were as good as Regina in getting the ski back down and going, you would not be running your 38 and probably not your 35 and you'd be hacking through your 32s. It's you, Than. I gar-own-tee that I could make that ski wheelie and not appear so awesome.

 

Agreed, if you could be a little more level and still maintain your stance through the turn like you do, you'll smooth out the hook-up and initial acceleration.

 

Short set-ups are no excuse. Try pulling out with one hand so the other is free to deal with the necessities.

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@Than_Bogan @jimbrake ! That reminds me of the time I was in Vancouver B.C. with a couple of other pals. We were drinking at a bar across town from where we had passes to a concert. We decided to jump into a limousine instead of a cab because it was right there and didn't cost much more. When we arrived there was a long line of folks waiting to get in. Nol casually eased out of the limo, followed by me, and then came Hadley exclaiming "Wow! I've never ridden in a limo before!" Totally blew our cool - as did the high school annual he was lugging around for his i.d.! That's what happens when you go clubbing with a physicist (insert computer engineer as needed!).
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